Friday, December 01, 2006

Two American girls become nuns in Italy...


On Monday, October 30, 2006, five ladies under the age of 30 made their first profession of vows as Sisters of the Adorers of the Royal Heart of Jesus Christ Sovereign Priest (a French Order of Sisters whose convent is located near Florence, Italy: http://www.institute-christ-king.org/AdorersRoyalHeart.htm ).

These sisters pray the Office and Mass exclusively according to the pre-conciliar Tridentine Rite.

During the ceremony the 5 brides were walked down the aisle by their fathers in their wedding gowns, were vested with the habit of the order and then received their new names of religious profession.

I made the trip into the Tuscan hills near Florence to attend the ceremony in the tiny hamlet of Gricigliano up the hill from the little town of Sieci. His Excellency the Most Rev. Luciano Giovannetti, Bishop of nearby Fiesole, was the celebrant.

Of the 5 young ladies who were professed, one was from Green Bay, Wisconsin and the other from Saint Paul, Minnesota. These sisters have yet to be consecrated and espoused to Christ their Bridegroom with their final solemn profession of vows which will occur a few years from now. The sisters have already completed one year of postulancy and now is their novitiate time in which they wear a white veil.

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

Was it required that these young ladies of Christ have French and/or Italian?

Thank you so much for your blog.

JPSonnen said...

young ladies who join or visit the order don't have to know any particular language when they arrive. but, as soon as they do arrive, they begin to speak french and only speak french. no italian is spoken or taught and the mother superior knows enough english to get by in communicating with visitors and new sisters.

Anonymous said...

No problem for the ladies no-french-speaking! The language more used is that of charity. Now there are many nuns professed, novices and postulants from USA, Ireland, and also Germany and Sweden, as well, of course, as from France.