Sunday, June 08, 2008

The biretta as seen on the streets of Rome...


In Rome there are some who perorate about local custom in regard to clerical dress and sometimes what they have to say is rather interesting.
For example, in Rome, one perogative of parish pastors is that only they wear the biretta on the street in their parish boundaries and only they wear the fascia sash.

6 comments:

Mark said...

only they wear the fascia sash

Can you explain? Is there another kind of sash?

Bro_Richard_Bailey@yahoo.co.uk said...

Yet another one of those myths put about by vestural amateurs. If only parish priests were to wear the fascia, what were all those seminarians supposed to do who were obliged to wear it both in college and in their university? Take it off on the way to uni, then put it back on again?
No, this is a mistake. There are no jurisdictional associations attached to the fascia, it simply "finishes" the cassock, rather like a neck tie for civilians. It should always be worn, and especially by seminarians, as encouraged by Bl John XXIII.

Anonymous said...

John, if I recall correctly, all Roman parish priests have in Urbe the privilege of the rochet, bugia, and use of the stole over the rochet in choro.

The biretta and sash thing... does not sound correct...

Thanks for the stimulating pics and comments.

Castor said...

a priest is not to wear the biretta in the street, unless he is the parish priest or has some jurisdiction. he should wear an ecclesiastical hat or nothing at all.

JPSonnen said...

Maybe it's just the black sash? I don't know. Frankly, a lot of the talk of what is custom and what is not in Rome, Paris, etc. is just bogus and sometimes just made-up.

Miguel José Ernst-Sandoval said...

"In Rome there are some who perorate about local custom in regard to clerical dress and sometimes what they have to say is rather interesting.
For example, in Rome, one perogative of parish pastors is that only they wear the biretta on the street in their parish boundaries and only they wear the fascia sash."


I have heard of this custom among Anglo-Catholics (and seen it followed), but never among Roman Catholic clergy. Perhaps this is something peculiar to the English-speaking lands?